Warning: Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at /home/dealkhus/cosmoread.com/wp-includes/formatting.php:5079) in /home/dealkhus/cosmoread.com/wp-content/themes/cosmoread/header.php on line 18

Warning: Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at /home/dealkhus/cosmoread.com/wp-includes/formatting.php:5079) in /home/dealkhus/cosmoread.com/wp-content/themes/cosmoread/header.php on line 19

Warning: Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at /home/dealkhus/cosmoread.com/wp-includes/formatting.php:5079) in /home/dealkhus/cosmoread.com/wp-content/themes/cosmoread/header.php on line 20

Warning: Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at /home/dealkhus/cosmoread.com/wp-includes/formatting.php:5079) in /home/dealkhus/cosmoread.com/wp-content/themes/cosmoread/header.php on line 21
FRESH
Home » Reference » Undercoating and Finishing an Electric Guitar

Undercoating and Finishing an Electric Guitar

Many first time guitar builders start out with electric guitar kits. While assembly can mostly be easy the actual finishing is rather a difficult job particularly if you are desiring a pro quality finish. We have covered some key pointers below to help those who are having trouble getting a high quality finish on their electric guitar.

Undercoating

If you\’re aiming for a solid color finish you will be applying an undercoat. Remember any bumps or marks left at this point will only get even more pronounced with each coat added here after so be sure you leave yourself a blemish-free surface to color on and remove any dust before you commence by wiping the guitar down with a damp cloth or rag before undercoating. It is very important to remember to adhere to only 1-2 coats and do not apply too thick. The aim of the undercoat is to allow you a good surface to paint on and nothing more. The timber of your guitar is an important factor in your tone (even in electric guitar kits) and it\’s important the finish is robust and protects the guitar but isn\’t applied to such an extent that the natural timber tones are masked.

Finishing (don\’t go overboard)

While finishing generally is applicable to both previous steps as well as your solid color coat and clear coats, it must be noted that when painting the guitar that you apply your coats continuously and build up the color slowly. There are two main reasons for this:

– Firstly if you apply light coats you\’ll avoid runs which can often be a real bother to fix on the go.
– Secondly applying light coats enables you to continuously build up the colour. If you apply too much paint you can certainly impact up on the tone of your guitar as discussed above as well as force issues such as having trouble getting your volume, tone and pickup switch selectors in place thanks to the paint being applied too thick underneath.

Drying Time

Do not expect to be applying a clear finishing coat and then playing the guitar the next day. Sometimes your new electric guitar kit will remain tacky for several weeks. Sometimes the rule of thumb is the guitar will take about a week to get to about 90% dry and then at least 1-2 months to become truly hard. Please, whatever you do don\’t start rubbing back with fine grade steel wool while still tacky, the fibers will become inserted in your still tacky coat and you will have a gigantic job on your hands to fix the damge done. When assembling and finishing electric guitar kits you really do need patience.

Remember your most important asset with finishing an electric guitar kit is typically patience and lots of it. If you\’re looking for more resources handling guitar kits drop by eguitarkits.com the web\’s best resource for guitar kit builders.