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Tornado Clusters

Clusters

Storm cluster is becoming more common and more deadly

Tornado Clusters
Tornado Clusters

#Cosmoread: Harmful deadly tornado clusters are becoming more common, a new study suggests.

The outbreak of twisters storm clusters that are several days. A terrible example in 2011, when 350 tornadoes ripped across the south-central United States, killing more than 300 people in the 25 to 28 April outbreak.

Tornado outbreak are responsible for 79 percent of deaths related to, Michael Tippett, Data Science Institute at the School of Applied Science and Engineering and a researcher of climate and weather, both at Columbia University in New York said.

Tippett’s new research shows a growing number of outbreaks is a tornado. When the tornado storm hundreds of eggs – a 4-fold increase in the chance of spreading extreme analysis discovered.

Researchers at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to record and analyze the tornado outbreak of 2014 were counted from 1954 when six or more EF-1 tornado, started within 6 hours of each other is a choice. Scientists per tornado outbreak, as well as the high and low numbers between twisters variability- calculate the average number of swings – which is related to the probability of extreme anger.

The findings were published February 29 in the journal Nature Communications. Study Joel Cohen, a mathematical and population biologist at Rockefeller University in New York population was coauthored by the chief of the laboratory and the Earth Institute of Columbia.

“These findings suggest that the risk of tornado outbreak far faster than previously recognized are growing,” Cohen told Live Science in an email interview.

Researchers at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to record and analyze the tornado outbreak of 2014 were counted from 1954 when six or more EF-1 tornado, started within six hours of each other is a choice. Twisters swings between high and low numbers – the average of the tornado outbreak, as well as variability was calculated.

The total number of tornadoes per year (EF-1 and the evaluation) remained stable since the 1950s, the study reported. Enhanced Fujita Scale, or EF scale, depending on wind speed and damage in tornado ranks. 86 and 110 mph (138 and 177 km / h) with the wind speed is rated an EF-1 tornado usually. An EF-5 is the highest rating.

However, the average number of tornadoes per outbreak from about 10 to about 15 in the 1950s rose in the past decade. Variability around that average rose four times faster. The statistical link, known as Taylor’s power law, has been seen in other areas, but never before with severe weather, Tippett told Live Science in an email interview.

The new findings from several recent studies suggest that the US tornado are becoming more likely to strike in groups that are compatible with. A NOAA study published in Science magazine in October 2014, with numerous tornadoes reported was an increase in the number of days. Another study, in the journal Climate Dynamics, published in July 2014, tornado found a similar clustering.

The researchers said they enhanced tornado outbreak can not blame climate change. However, the planet warming weather patterns across the United States may transfer trigger more tornado. For example, extreme weather, storms that spawn system for several days now more likely to be stuck in one place. Increasing heat in the first year of unstable weather could boost sparking tornado outbreaks.

“We know what is driving these changes in the climate system want. Some climate change is implicated. We think that such a conclusion is premature, and further study is needed,” Tippett said.