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Home » Featured » Melanoma Moles
Intermediate Melanoma

Melanoma Moles

Intermediate Melanoma
Intermediate Melanoma

May many melanoma patients have some moles

#Cosmoread: Check out the moles on your skin is a common way to look for the deadly skin cancer melanoma, but a new study suggests many people with melanoma may have a few moles.

Researchers in the study of 560 people with melanoma and found that 66 percent of them had 20 or fewer moles.

The new results show that all people, including those who have a few moles, “they should be paying attention to moles on their skin really should be watching carefully and regularly, ask your doctor for moles skin checks, “said study author Alan C. Geller, a senior lecturer at Harvard tH chan school of public health in Boston.

The researchers also found about moles that 20.5 percent of people in the study were 20 to 50 moles, and 13.1 percent had more than 50 moles. The people in the study had an average age of 57.

In patients under the age of 60, those who had more than 50 miles, which was lower than those compared with 50 moles, melanoma tumors that thin (less than 2 millimeters thick, or 0.08 about an inch) were used. The thickness indicates how deep the melanoma skin cancer moles  is gone, and so is the conclusion shows that moles have a lot of people did not have the most severe cases of melanoma.

However, researchers also found that the way a moles  looks remains important. People who have five or more moles that ordinary, apart from non-melanoma moles saw thick melanoma (more than 2 mm thick) had a higher risk, compared with those who had no such moles, researchers found.

Previous studies to an increased risk of melanoma moles  is linked to a greater number of moles, the researchers said. The new study is a reminder that even the people who have known risk factors for melanoma moles  have many moles or other skin cancer is still not as acts, the researchers said.

This is because of various risk factors for melanoma moles, “each has its own problems,” Geller said.

For example, although a family history is a risk factor for melanoma moles, most people who get melanoma moles have no family history of melanoma, Geller told .

And although people who have an increased risk of melanoma moles  have had sunburns, many people at some point in their lives have had sunburn but did not develop melanoma moles, he said.

The bottom line is that people should pay attention to your skin, and any changes in their moles should start looking for, Geller said. Those who started to see any changes in a moles, “and to see the doctor should make sure that their – their primary- care physician or dermatologist – it takes a good look,” he said.

Geller recommends that people following changes in moles, which dermatologists abbreviation “ABCD” to remember to look out for any use: asymmetry (one side of the moles starts to look different from the other side) , limit (moles starts to change around the border), color (color change sesame, goes deeper, for example) and diameter (the diameter of the moles of a pencil eraser head) becomes more widespread.

The National Cancer Institute estimates that 74,000 people in the US will be diagnosed with melanoma in 2016, and approximately 10,000 people will die from the disease this year.